In the News: How to Get Disaster Information in a Disaster

Trusted media sites and social media are good sources for local information, breaking news and weather updates during and after natural disasters. Here are some ways to use the media to your best advantage.


Newspaper - online, apps and old fashioned

Your newspaper will include shelter locations, volunteer opportunities, evacuation information and emergency services' hotline numbers.
  1. After a natural disaster or major event, papers often feature information on how to work with FEMA, the Red Cross and other community resources.
  2. Weather information can be found online, via apps, and on the back of a major section of most newspapers.
  3. Check the newspaper's site for up-to-the-minute info.

TV

  1. TV stations, their sites, social media outlets and apps (if they have one) announce advisories and/or warnings for community and natural disasters as well as post-event information you may need.
  2. Local and national stations send camera crews to cover news after a disaster.
  3. After a natural disaster or major event, local television stations' web site and social media often link to FEMA, the Red Cross and other community resources.

WHN EXPERT TIP: Lights, Camera ...

If you are approached by a news camera, it is completely up to you if you want to talk or not. If you start an interview, you can always stop it.

Radio

  1. Radio stations their sites, social media outlets and apps (if they have one) announce appropriate advisories and/or warnings for community and natural disasters as well as post-event information you may need.
  2. After a natural disaster or major event, radio station web sites and social media channels often feature information on how to work with FEMA, the Red Cross and other community resources.

Internet/Social Media

  1. Remember that news organizations are posting information constantly, so some of it may not be accurate and will change as the outlet gets new information.
  2. If you are in a disaster yourself, don't use your cell phone if at all possible (need to keep the battery as long as possible if power is out). Use e-mail once to inform family, friends and colleagues of whereabouts and updates. Or, text one person and ask them to email family and friends. Alternatively, if you have a Facebook page, post that you're OK.
  3. When the power is out at home and your phone or tablet needing charging, locate the nearest, safe outlet for charging.

    WHN STAFF TIP: Your Contact List is in your phone, which has no battery left.

    Keep an up-to-date primary contact list in your e-mail draft folder to print for emergencies. At the very least, this list should include names, phone numbers and e-mail addresses.

Local Sources

  1. Remember, your local authorities and officials might have more about up-to-date information than the above sources.
  2. Ask them for best routes, weather information, when to evacuate and when to return home.

Additional Information

  1. Weather Information

  2. Media Links